Liturgy and Prayer

Liturgy of the Hours

The Liturgy of the Hours, based on the psalms and prayed daily in the monastery, is a means for God to be praised, a vehicle for the needs of all people in every part of the world to be remembered, and an opportunity for members to be shaped and changed.

September 27

Feast of St. Vincent de Paul

Why we read from the Rule of Benedict

The Rule of Benedict is a spiritual guide, rare by virtue of its ancient origins, valued for its continuing meaningfulness in every century since. It is wisdom literature. It stresses the need and nature of real community. It brings the rhythm and ointment of prayer. The Rule brings a life based on the equality and reverence that a world in search of peace requires. — The Rule of Benedict: A Spirituality for the 21st Century by Joan Chittister, OSB

Read from Chapter 7:
Humility

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Liturgy and Prayer Schedule

Sunday Liturgy: 9:30 a.m.
Morning Praise: 6:30 a.m. weekdays; 8:30 a.m. weekends
Evening Praise: 5:30 p.m.
(During Lent and Advent, Saturday Vigil is at 7:00 p.m.)

About the Liturgical Seasons

Ordinary Time: The Wisdom of Routine

But the truth is that there is nothing ordinary—if by ordinary we mean inferior or less important—about a period such as this at all. This, on the other hand, is the extraordinary period of coming to see the world through the eyes of Jesus. It is the period when we determine how we ourselves will act from now on. It is the period of catechesis in the faith, of immersion in the Scriptures. It is the time when the implications of Easter and Christmas become most clear to us all. It is decision time: will we take Easter and Christmas seriously or not?

─Joan Chittister, OSB
The Liturgical Year: The Spiraling Adventure of the Spiritual Life


New Liturgy from A to Z topics are posted each Saturday.

Salvation, enlightenment, and transformation

Posted on September 26, 2020

While re-visiting the books and articles used in Liturgy classes, I was drawn to a piece entitled Time and Liturgy by Thomas Merton. Excerpts about the liturgical year follow:

For one in Christ, the cycle of the seasons is something entirely new. It has become a cycle of salvation. The year is not just another year, it is the year of the Lord – a year in which the passage of time itself brings us not only the natural renewal of spring and the fruitfulness of an earthly summer, but also the spiritual and interior fruitfulness of grace. The life of the flesh which ebbs and flows like the seasons and tends always to its last decline is elevated and supplanted by a life of the spirit which knows no decrease, which always grows in those who live with Christ in the liturgical year.

The liturgy makes the very passage of time sanctify our lives, for each new season renews an aspect of the great Mystery of Christ living and present in His Church. Each recurring season shows us some new way in which we live in Him, in which He acts in the world. Each new feast draws our attention to the great truth of His presence in the midst of us, and shows us a different aspect of the Paschal Mystery in our world.

The liturgical year is a year of salvation, but also a year of enlightenment and of transformation.

The liturgy is the great school of Christian living and the transforming force which reshapes our souls and our characters in the likeness of Christ.

Let nothing be preferred to the Work of God – Rule of Benedict 43:3

Reference:
Seasons of Celebration by Thomas Merton, 1965, pages 51 - 53

A to Z Topics


Sister Karen Oprenchok, author of Liturgy from A to Z posts, is a scholastic in initial monastic formation.