Liturgy and Prayer

Liturgy of the Hours

The Liturgy of the Hours, based on the psalms and prayed daily in the monastery, is a means for God to be praised, a vehicle for the needs of all people in every part of the world to be remembered, and an opportunity for members to be shaped and changed.

October 18

St. Luke

Why we read from the Rule of Benedict

The Rule of Benedict is a spiritual guide, rare by virtue of its ancient origins, valued for its continuing meaningfulness in every century since. It is wisdom literature. It stresses the need and nature of real community. It brings the rhythm and ointment of prayer. The Rule brings a life based on the equality and reverence that a world in search of peace requires. — The Rule of Benedict: A Spirituality for the 21st Century by Joan Chittister, OSB

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Liturgy and Prayer Schedule

Sunday Liturgy: 9:30 a.m.
Morning Praise: 6:30 a.m. weekdays; 8:30 a.m. weekends
Evening Praise: 5:30 p.m.
(During Lent and Advent, Saturday Vigil is at 7:00 p.m.)

About the Liturgical Seasons

Ordinary Time: The Wisdom of Routine

But the truth is that there is nothing ordinary—if by ordinary we mean inferior or less important—about a period such as this at all. This, on the other hand, is the extraordinary period of coming to see the world through the eyes of Jesus. It is the period when we determine how we ourselves will act from now on. It is the period of catechesis in the faith, of immersion in the Scriptures. It is the time when the implications of Easter and Christmas become most clear to us all. It is decision time: will we take Easter and Christmas seriously or not?

─Joan Chittister, OSB
The Liturgical Year: The Spiraling Adventure of the Spiritual Life


New Liturgy from A to Z topics are posted each Saturday.

Go into your room

Posted on October 12, 2019
Office book

The following includes excerpts from a treatise on Cain and Abel written by Saint Ambrose, bishop (339 - 397 AD). It is a part of the Office of Readings for Monday of the Twenty-Seventh Week in Ordinary Time.

In his divine wisdom, Jesus taught you about the goodness of God, who knows how to give good things, so that you might ask for the things that are good from Goodness itself. He urges you to pray earnestly and frequently, not offering long and wearisome prayers, but praying often, and with perseverance. Lengthy prayers are usually filled with empty words, while neglect of prayer results in indifference to prayer.

Christ urges you, when you ask forgiveness for yourself, to be especially generous to others, so that your actions may commend your prayer. The Apostle, too, teaches you how to pray: you must avoid anger and contentiousness, so that your prayer may be serene and wholesome. He tells you also that every place is a place of prayer, though our Savior says: Go into your room.

By “room” you must understand, not a room enclosed by walls that imprison your body, but the room that is within you, the room where you hide your thoughts, where you keep your affections. This room of prayer is always with you, wherever you are, and it is always a secret room, where only God can see you.

If you pray only for yourself, you will be praying for yourself alone. If you pray for all, all will pray for you, for you are included in all. In this way there is a great recompense; through the prayers of each individual, the intercession of the whole people is gained for each individual. There is here no pride, but an increase of humility and a richer harvest from prayer.

Let nothing be preferred to the Work of God – Rule of Benedict 43:3

A to Z Topics


Sister Karen Oprenchok, author of Liturgy from A to Z posts, is a scholastic in initial monastic formation.